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November 11, 2019

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American Record Label censors K-POP group BTS's hit song "Fake Love"

May 24, 2018

 

My daughter brought something to my attention today, kind of in passing but It really did get me to thinking about it.

 

She is 15 and into this K-POP music or Korean Pop music, a musical genre consisting of electronic, hip hop, pop, rock, and R&B music originating in South Korea. One of her favorite groups is named BTS “Bangtan Sonyeondan”. 

 

From left to right Kim Taehyung (V), Min Yoongi (Suga), Kim SeokJin (Jin), Jeon Jungkook, Kim Namjoon (RM), Park Jimin and Jung Hoseok (J-hope)

 

Man these guys Korean names made my English spell check have a heart attack! 

 

Now I have to say that K-POP is not exactly my type of music (I am more classical, Jazz, Blues, and classic rock) but after listening to BTS I can say that they seem to be some very talented young men. My daughter comes close to living and breathing this band so I trust her word when she tells me that they are also pretty good people, meaning they are not prone to racist remarks or opinions in any way whatsoever.

 

So I was pretty surprised when she told me that their very first song released for play on the radio in the United States, had been censored for a possibly offensive word that sounded like a racial slur.

 

Being that my daughter lives in the same house, hearing the band BTS is pretty much unavoidable. What I noticed from that, is that these guys for the most part... only sing in Korean. I mean from what I understand only one group member is even fluent in English. So I am thinking to myself, what Korean words could possibly be offensive to English speaking Americans?

 

Well apparently its this Korean word 거부 or Neaga (pronounced like the slang word "nigga" )which can mean I, me, or even myself from what I understand. Now I do not speak Korean, neither am I informed at all as to what the grammatical rules are for Korean word usage. I am just looking at the word itself, its literal definition, and pronunciation. Why would American radio feel the need to censor it?

 

Now, I watched the following video several times and I honestly do not think I would have even noticed it if I was not listening for it. I will let you judge for yourself. The first place I noticed what KIND OF sounded like the N word was at 1:13 so if you do not want to listen to the whole song you can just play up to a little past there. Even listening for it I had to rewind and play it again a couple of times.

 

 

 

 

 But, I guess if you are overly hypersensitive and spend your waking moments looking for the next anything to get triggered over, it would stand out like a piss trail in a snowbank.

 

I am not, and it didn't. 

 

We all hear things differently though, and there are many, many factors involved with that. Just look back at the whole Laurel or Yanni craze a week or so ago, and there is no lack of science behind it either. With 10 people hearing the same exact sound we will most likely see at least half of them describe it a little bit differently than the others. Our culture is of course one of those factors, especially when it comes to words, and especially In the politically correct world we live in today.

 

Every culture has some word(s) or phrase that is exclusively derogatory to them, every one of them. So not only our ears, but our minds have through adaptation become tuned to those sounds. Others in our culture foster this by what we hear them say. That is how we learn about them to begin with. . 

 

What are words after all but one or a combined series of simple sounds that we interpret for meaning. If our auditory interpretations are wrong, then so is the meaning we attach to them.

 

So this is a case of censorship based on well, nothing. The claim from the left is that this censorship their doing is to try and stop hate speech.

 

The word Neaga is not in any way, shape or form hate speech. It is a word in Korean that means me, or I. And as far as I know the Korean language around the 14th century predates the "N" word around the 17th century, by about 300 years. ( that's longer than the United States has even existed to put things into perspective.)

 

It was not a racist word 600 years ago, and it is not a racist word now, so how can the leftists justify censoring it as hate speech? 

 

The way it SOUNDS might be misinterpreted by someone who speaks only English and offend them thereby being hate speech. That's the logic. 

 

Needless to say BTS fans were less than pleased. ( Click Image for article )

 

 

Personally I agree with their fears and see them as 100% valid. Do we really want a country that would deny another country's citizens success here if they do not bow down to the will of one or more of our minority groups. Do what WE say, or we will make sure you never succeed here.

 

That is NOT the America I grew up loving, it is NOT the America I know.

 

The general American isn’t going to do research and find out what the word naega means but instead be stupid and say that they’re saying the N word and give a blow to bts’ US career. if they censor it at the BBMAs they might as well not even perform that damn song cause….

— (@gangtanboys) May 18, 2018

 

 

 

It is no secret that the SJW's here in America are ruining peoples careers and therefore lives in their attempt to eliminate free speech and push their agenda. And no, from what I see everyday in this country these SJW's have ZERO interest in finding out anything, they run entirely on what THEY believe to be true and their fuel is pure hatred.

 

I agree 100% that TRUE hate speech needs to be dealt with. But we can never do that if people are able to turn anything they do not like into hate speech. Anything we get rid of will just be replaced by five more things, it will never end.

 

But what are we really doing here? This, is not hate speech, but it is being censored anyway and could have a very negative impact on these young artists careers.

 

We are talking about censoring part of someone else's national LANGUAGE because it SOUNDS similar to something in our language that people do not like..

 

Is that the next step in this PC absurdity? Are we going to go through everyone else's languages picking out words we do not like because they SOUND like English words deemed offensive by one minority or another? And then basically deny them the right to speak their own language in our country? Because whether its one word or a thousand that's exactly what this is.

 

Sense there is no factual hate speech associated with this word, it is simply being censored for the way it sounds, that means it is the language itself that is being censored. 

 

Are the Koreans supposed to what, change the pronunciation or eliminate the use of a 600 year old word in their language because it sounds like an English word that is considered a racial slur?

 

Would not doing so be a classic example of racial discrimination against these young South Koreans, by not allowing them to speak there own language without having it censored?

 

The thing is that the PC based censorship in this country is starting to reach far beyond absurdity right into being flat out Orwellian, its dangerous and needs to be brought back under control.

 

The thing I really want to know in all of this is where is the concern for these young South Koreans right to operate and grow their business here in America, make a good life for themselves? That is the American dream is it not? 

 

And where is all of this acceptance of other cultures, you know diversity? Is restricting the use of another cultures own language through censorship because you may not like the way words in that language sound a good way to do that?

 

I guess here in America we just took another step towards making the George Orwell book 1984 a reality. You cannot use your own language in the United States if there are any of your words that may sound like a bad English word. We will censor or ban you.

 

Welcome to America BTS.

 

 Something to look into?

 

The Universal Declaration of Linguistic Rights (approved in Spain in 1996)

  • The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (adopted in 1992, Council of Europe)

  • Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (1995, Council of Europe)

 

https://hubpages.com/education/Language-rights-in-human-and-civil-rights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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